Pork Chop

 

Ingredients

Makes 2 chops

  • 2 12oz Bone-in Pork Chops [doesn't have to be bone-in. Could be bone-out. We're equal opportunity here.
  • A couple thimbles full of Canola oil. [You just need some on the bottom of the pan to conduct heat to the pork. Don't freak out over how much. 3 tablespoons? 10 grams? Why not?!]
  • 2 Splashkies of white wine [this is a standard use of measurement in my home bar]
  • One squirt dijon mustard [squeeze the bottle until it makes one fart noise]
  • Small child's handful capers [or exactly 34]
  • Half a stick of butter [but which half is up to you]
  • Kosher salt
This picture makes a

This picture makes a


Recipe

Anthony LeDonne Cooks Pork Chops In A Water Bath.jpg
  1. Cook the pork chops in a 135˚F water bath for about an hour for medium rare, 141˚F for medium. The exact time isn't important; aim for between 1-2 hours.
  2. Remove the chops from the bag and dry with paper towels so it browns all pretty like. The hot oil has to evaporate the moisture before it can start browning the pork. The more moisture, the longer it sits in the pan, potentially overcooking it. [This is bad.]
  3. Sprinkle on a liberal amount of salt. Like college student liberal.
  4. Heat a pan over high heat. Add oil and heat until it starts to smoke.
  5. Add chops and cook for 3 minutes on one side [the presentation side] and 1 minute on the other [the other side].
  6. Remove chops from the pan and reserve [fancy for "put them on a plate"]. 
  7. Deglaze the pan with the whine wine. Deglazing just means throw liquid in a hot pan and scrape the bottom to free all the brown bits [technically called "fond"]. This not only adds incredible flavor to your pan sauce, it aids in cleanup. #lazy.
  8. Reduce until almost all the wine is evaporated.
  9. Add dijon and remove from the heat. Stir in butter. Add capers. 
  10. Plate the pork all fancy-like and spoon a few spoonfuls of the pan sauce over. 
  11. Eat. 
I'm hungry just reviewing this blog post.

I'm hungry just reviewing this blog post.

 
foodAnthony LeDonne